Jordanian chef Omar Sartawi and designers Princess Nejla Asem and Salam Dajani work to design sustainable face masks using eggplant skin, during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), at Dajani's workshop in Amman, Jordan, June 8, 2020. Picture taken June 8, 2020. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed

Designers work on the final product at a workshop in Amman (Picture: REUTERS)

A Jordanian chef has come up with a novel way of creating sustainable face masks using leftover things from his own kitchen.

Omar Sartawi has a special technique to use aubergine skins to make a mouth and nose covering for people to use during the coronavirus pandemic.

Omar processes the strips of aubergine peel using a lot of salt to create a type of leather.

Then all he has to do is add the straps to turn them into face masks.

Jordanian designers Princess Nejla Asem and Salam Dajani took care of the aesthetic side of the designs, once Omar had perfected his process.

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Models present face masks made using eggplant skin by Jordanian chef Omar Sartawi, and designed by Jordanian designers Princess Nejla Asem and Salam Dajani, in Amman, Jordan, June 17, 2020. Picture taken June 17, 2020. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed

They actually look really cool (Picture: REUTERS)

Omar Sartawi, a Jordanian chef, presents eggplant peels after processing them to produce a type of leather to make sustainable face masks, during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), at his kitchen in Amman, Jordan, June 8, 2020. Picture taken June 8, 2020. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed

Omar came up with the clever process in his kitchen (Picture: REUTERS)

Omar Sartawi, a Jordanian chef, processes aubergine peels to produce a type of leather to make sustainable face masks, amid the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), at his kitchen in Amman, Jordan, June 8, 2020. Picture taken June 8, 2020. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed

The process turns the aubergine peel into a kind of leather (Picture: REUTERS)

Salam Dajani, a Jordanian designer, sews eggplant skin to make sustainable face masks, amid the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), at her workshop in Amman, Jordan, June 8, 2020. Picture taken June 8, 2020. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed

Salam Dajani sews aubergine skin to make the mask (Picture: REUTERS)

Jordanian chef Omar Sartawi and Jordanian designers Princess Nejla Asem and Salam Dajani work to design sustainable face masks using eggplant skin, during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, at Dajani's workshop in Amman, Jordan, June 8, 2020. Picture taken June 8, 2020. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed

The final design was created by two designers (Picture: REUTERS)

The aubergine skins are actually sewn together using cotton thread to make them durable, and skin becomes as tough as leather, while still being breathable enough to wear on your face.

The best thing about these masks is that they are made entirely from sustainable materials, and could even help to reduce food waste by using up discarded aubergine peel.

Who knew this humble vegetable could have such an innovative use outside of the kitchen?

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